How will machine learning shape the future of writing?

Machine learning is a widely used application of AI that allows programmes to learn from extensive datasets without being programmed manually.

It can replace, as the paragraph itself implies, certain writing tasks being automated, leading to job loss for low-cost/low-skilled writers.

Imagine this: it takes almost half a lifetime for a human being to read enough to be able to pick up the art of writing and then actually write and get published, let alone be exceptionally adept in it.

Human labour has value, and that is why we still patronise such labour.

If you cannot differentiate the text written by a human author from that written by a machine, would you be willing to pay for it as much as you did before?

Human creativity, apart from following others and learning certain strategies, also requires raw feelings and emotions.

The only hope I see for the near future is collaboration between machines and human writers where, rather than competing with each other, both would complement each other’s skills and continue to produce great reads.

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Blue the robot could be the AI-powered workhorse of the future

Blue, a new robot from UC Berkeley, aims to break that mold with the help of AI. Blue looks a little bit like a child’s drawing of a robot: it’s made from bulky, 3D-printed parts, and it has a pair of humanoid robot arms with pincers for hands.

Pieter Abbeel, the roboticist leading the project, wants to change this, and he says Blue has been built from the ground up to take advantage of recent improvements in AI. “The fact that AI is becoming more capable gave us an opportunity to rethink how to design a robot,” Abbeel tells The Verge.

PR2, a popular research robot built by Willow Garage that also has a pair of arms and pincers, set researchers back around $400,000.

The Elon Musk-founded research lab OpenAI has done similar work using robot hands, and Google is also exploring AI-training for robots.

The robot is being built in small batches right now, but Abbeel hopes to scale up, eventually moving to outsourced manufacturing to produce larger numbers.

Offering a cheaper robot will make them more widely available, boosting the output of robot research.

Abbeel hopes that Blue will provide a blueprint for what the home robot of the future could look like: something that is low cost, flexible, and plays well with humans

https://berkeleyopenrobotics.github.io/

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Google’s Stadia looks like an early beta of the future of gaming

“The future of gaming is not a box,” according to Google.

Instead, you’ll just need access to Google’s Chrome browser to instantly play games on a phone, tablet, PC, or TV. It’s a bold vision for where gaming is heading, and Google hopes its Stadia cloud streaming service will make it a reality.

Google may have just unveiled the future of gaming at the Game Developers Conference, but it’s a future the company has left us knowing very little about.

Google even unveiled its own Stadia Games and Entertainment studio to create Stadia-exclusive titles, but it didn’t mention any details on what games it will be building.

Google has omitted key details about Stadia In an interview with Kotaku, Google Stadia boss Phil Harrison says, “[W]e will be able to get to 4K but only raise that bandwidth to about 30 Mbps.” That means the average fixed broadband connection in the US, currently around 96 Mbps by some estimates, will be sufficient, but if you’re living in a state without broadband coverage or relying on rural internet speeds then you’ll be stuck waiting on the Federal Communications Commission to raise the minimum rural broadband speed standard to 25 Mbps. You’ll also need a connection without broadband caps because if you’re going to be playing games a lot, then it will soon eat into data limits.

All of this makes Stadia look like an early beta for what will be part of the future of gaming.

Google has some fierce competition, but it looks like this cloud gaming war is just getting started.

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